note:

I'm no longer able to access my old Facebook profile, pages or groups.
(Also the old Hotmail email address is long gone).

Saturday, January 18, 2014

Grace Morton on Temperament


From "Understanding and Dressing to Temperament" chapter in Grace Morton's "The Arts of Costume and Personal Appearance."

"Having been introduced to the many factors which, when mastered, enable one to select costume technically right, there is yet to be considered that culminating aspect of taste known as dressing to express mood and temperament.  And for this we need insight into and understanding of human nature in addition to our knowledge of design and color, texture, and the techniques of camouflaging figures.

We have been told that its secret lies in dressing to suite one's personality, but many of us have entertained a secret wish to know more about that elusive quality called one's personality.  One author has an answer in her descriptions of certain historic characters and their modern counterparts, i.e., the maternal, the intellectual, the exotic, the queenly, the youthful, etc. (Story) Another writer would have us 'cast our role,' as a coquette, or sophisticate; a romantic type or a gamine; a patrician or an exotic personality (Byers)."

"...the maternal, the intellectual, the exotic, the queenly, the youthful...a coquette, or sophisticate; a romantic type or a gamine; a patrician or an exotic..."

"Turning to social psychology we find the well-known and accepted authority, Allport, stating that personality is based on native physical endowment and habit systems....

...Anatomical characteristics of 'size, weight, proportion of body, texture of hair and skin,' coloring, etc.

...Temperamental traits or characteristics of emotional moods. 'Most individuals have a characteristic emotional level.  The leading question concerning a particular person is 'What part do emotions play in his daily life? Is he choleric or phlegmatic? ... " etc.



... but hey, don't listen to me, EXPRESS YOUR TRUTH! Jane


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