Open top menu
Wednesday, August 1, 2012


Dominance (Type 3)

Comparatively High

Here are some traits and behaviours that describe people who are comparatively high inDominance:
  • enjoy competition and challenge.
  • are goal orientated and want to be recognised for their efforts.
  • aim high, want authority and are generally resourceful and adaptable.
  • are usually self-sufficient and individualistic.
  • may lose interest in projects once the challenge has gone and they tend to be impatient and dissatisfied with minor detail.
They are usually direct and positive with people, enjoying being the centre of attraction and may take it for granted that people will think highly of them.
They may have a tendency to be rather critical of others. Consequently, other people may tend to see them as being rather domineering and overpowering.

Comparatively Low

Here are some traits and behaviours that describe people who are comparatively low inDominance:
  • tend to want peace and harmony.
  • prefer to let others initiate action and resolve problems.
  • are quiet and indirect in their approach to most situations.
  • are usually cautious and calculate risks carefully before acting.
They are generally well liked because of their mild and gentle nature. Other people will tend to see them as being patient, calm, thoughtful and a good listener.

Influence (Type 1)

Comparatively High

Here are some traits and behaviours that describe people who are comparatively high inInfluence:
  • are strongly interested in meeting and being with people.
  • are generally optimistic, outgoing, and socially skilled.
  • are quick at establishing relationships.
Sometimes their concern for people and people's feelings may make them reluctant to disturb a favourable situation or relationship.

Comparatively Low

Here are some traits and behaviours that describe people who are comparatively low inInfluence:
  • are usually socially passive.
  • quite frequently have an affinity for things, machinery and equipment.
  • are generally comfortable working alone.
  • frequently have a tendency to be analytical and once they have sorted the facts out they communicate them in a straightforward direct way.
  • tend to take little at face value.
They may well have learned and developed good social skills but they only bring these into play when logic dictates such tactics.

Steadiness (Type 2)

Comparatively High

Here are some traits and behaviours that describe people who are comparatively high inSteadiness:
  • are usually patient, calm and controlled.
  • have a high willingness to help others particularly those they consider as friends.
Generally they have the ability to deal with the task in hand and to do routine work with patience and care.

Comparatively Low

Here are some traits and behaviours that describe people who are comparatively low inSteadiness:
  • tend to enjoy change and variety in their work and non-work life.
  • are expansive by nature and tend not to like routine and repetitive work/activities.
They enjoy stretching themselves intellectually and physically.

Compliance (Type 4)

Comparatively High

Here are some traits and behaviours that describe people who are comparatively high inCompliance:
  • are usually peaceful and adaptable.
  • tend not to be aggressive.
  • tend to be cautious rather than impulsive.
  • avoid risk-taking.
  • act in a tactful, diplomatic way and strive for a stable, ordered life.
  • are comfortable following procedures in both their personal and business life.
They prefer sticking to methods that have proved successful in the past. They have a high acceptance of rules and regulations.

Comparatively Low

Here are some traits and behaviours that describe people who are comparatively low inCompliance:
  • are independent and uninhibited.
  • resent rules and restrictions.
  • prefer to be measured by results and are always willing to try the untried.
Free in thought, word and deed, they long for freedom and go to great lengths to achieve it.
They feel that repetitive detail and routine work is best "delegated" or avoided.


Follow by email (see top right)
Send me an email: janerekas@hotmail.com Jane Rekas, LCSW
Tagged
Jane Rekas
Written by Jane Rekas

Jane Leu Rekas, LCSW, CHt, writes a blog about seasonal color analysis and the four humors. She is certified in Color Me A Season color analysis and does Color Profiles individualized fabric fans online and in Hood River, Oregon.

3 comments

  1. Kim B says:

    Very helpful, thank you for posting this synthesis! Two categories tied for my "natural style" in the DISC quiz, both scores at 88% (these being my dominant and secondary DYT Types 2/4). I wonder how that translates for my DYT, where I recognize my secondary strongly in personality and thought habits yet bear none of the physical/style/Winter season markers. I notice you're also neck-and-neck with Types 4/2 and hover between soft winter and soft summer influences. Which do you find takes the reigns: dominant tone/type as it determines colors and shapes, or the leadings of personality when they sometimes contradict that due to such a strong presence of secondary nature?

  2. @Kim B, wow, you really get the dilemma I'm exploring here. What happens when you have two dominant parts that are equal?! I will write a post on your questions. I also commented on your Meta/Fem blog, which is awesome. http://metafem.blogspot.com/

  3. Kim B says:

    Thanks for your kind words re: my blog! I've savored reading the 'expressing your truth' blog page by page and have learned a great deal in the process. You've enriched my sense of how to adapt the DYT material to my needs and explore its roots and broader implications from various angles, while navigating the various other systems available. Thanks for sharing your insights with this great resource.

    (Sidebar: I love that you created a Pinterest board for DYT Type 2 'not so girly' - acknowledging that Type 2 need not be exclusive to and synonymous with Romantic fashion/style.)

check out my other blogs:

check out my other blogs:

My Blogs

Street style

Street style

Street Style

other style blogs:

other style blogs:

Other Blogs

Feed Blitz Follow and Receive Posts by Email

Your email address:


Powered by FeedBlitz

Expressing Your Truth Polyvore